Review: Island

island

Island is a thoroughly challenging book. From the first page, Aldous Huxley’s complex diction and intelligently illusive opinions are like steam engines plowing through my consciousness. His brute force is not only limited to internal dialogue or reflection, nor is it softened by allegory. He confronts me on every page in the characters’ conversations, and […]

Continue reading →

Fahrenheit 451 Response

f451

I have not been educated by “the world,” but by a community of conservative Lutherans. Therefore, my struggle is one less blatantly engaged with the animal perversions of American materialism and consumerism depicted in Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451. My ears are trained electric fences, charged to repel psychological advertising, and my eyes are fixed forward […]

Continue reading →

Spinning Confidence

Author’s Note In Spinning Confidence, the water is my sanctuary of encouragement. I reflect on my desire to construct or “spin” confidence in myself and in my accomplishments. I claim this faith by defying the ordinary and making the most of an average opportunity. Because the battle for self-confidence is internal, I chose to use […]

Continue reading →

Lost at Sea

Author’s Note In my Flash Fiction, Lost at Sea, water is seen both as a conduit of change, and a reliable source of direction. The jellies are content with their journey until they are tempted to move freely like the fish of the illusive depths. The jellies fall into destruction only when they carve themselves […]

Continue reading →

Back to Where It Was

Author’s Note I titled my short story, Back to Where It Was, alluding to Toni Morrison’s quote, “All water has a perfect memory and is forever trying to get back to where it was.” My main character, Tess, echoes this nostalgia and laments how quickly present joy is lost behind clouded memory. She strongly desires […]

Continue reading →

Measurement

In your wide eyes, There was no measurement:   You noted the spectrum Each wavelength of expression A tattoo’s location Or a man’s feminine diction Compassionately curious Your memory captured connections Not for harsh inspection But for boundless admiration   My mind skipped as they passed To you each stranger’s stories mattered Just as with […]

Continue reading →

Review: The Lathe of Heaven (part 2)

As a Christian reader grounded in concrete Western Theology, I hesitate to fully digest the nebulous language that emerges from Ursula Le Guin’s Eastern Mystical philosophy in her novel, The Lathe of Heaven. I can appreciate figurative personification as art when she explains, ‘rocks have their dreams and the earth changes,” but naturally I question spiritual […]

Continue reading →

Spinning Confidence (draft)

The confidence of a diver impresses me. To stand straight, cold and exposed on the unstable end of a spring platform, completely aware of position – height from bellyflop, jump distance from concussion, depth of concussion absorbant – it is like the mark of a young adult hero [1]. And those teens in long boardshorts, […]

Continue reading →

Review: The Lathe of Heaven

Ursula Le Guin captures my interest with powerful, original, and unobtrusive figurative language.  She makes allusions to sci-fi dystopian novels Brave New World and 1984, and even names her main character George Orr. Similes and metaphors are poetically precise, such as when she compares Orr to a ‘red, blind, and wet…newborn baby’ after he dunks […]

Continue reading →

The Lathe of Heaven – Ursula Le Guin

lathe

I found this book on a list of powerful philosophical literature along with Orwell, Golding, Salinger, Huxley, Lowry, Juster, and Lewis. I respect these authors and was interested in the premise of Le Guin’s novel. She writes about a man who can change reality with his dreams! It supposedly attacks the philosophy of eugenics and does so with a […]

Continue reading →